Imperfect Clocks

  • Writer Craig Callender refers to Newton’s theory of absolute time as the “perfect clock”: undefinable, invisible, and independent to the contents of the physical universe. Thus, the ways in which humans define and process time relative to our experiences are all imperfect clocks.

    This group of fourteen artists reveals a physical manifestation and/or metaphysical evidence of time through formal abstraction in their works. The space between this duality is explored with ideas of perception, history, intimacy, nature, decay and the collective human experience.

  • Yuji Agematsu, ZIP: 06.01.2018...06.30.18, 2018

    mixed media in cigarette pack cellophane wrappers (30 units) on wood backed acrylic shelf, latex paint

    wrappers: 2 1/2 x 2 1/8 x 1 inches (6.3 x 5.3 x 2.4 cm) (each)
    shelving unit: 26 1/2 x 34 1/4 x 5 1/4 inches (67.3 x 87 x 13.3 cm)

    (CH513)

    Yuji Agematsu

    ZIP: 06.01.2018...06.30.18, 2018

    Since the late 1980s, Yuji Agematsu’s obsessive and visionary practice has included daily walks through the streets of Manhattan. During these walks, the artist collects fragments of New York’s detritus and places his findings into cellophane wrappers. Agematsu has fashioned a singular aesthetic by means of focused and sustained observation. The artist's clarity of focus in relation the city’s debris, paired with his esoteric sculptural sensibilities, has resulted in thousands of diminutive sculptures that serve as diaristic records of the mundane human existence. The artist amasses accreting materials, inclining towards the viscous - gum, hair, sugar - along with the various substances they’ve procured in the process. 

  • GENESIS BÁEZ, NUBES (CLOUDS), 2019
    single channel video
    dimensions variable
    Edition of 7
    (CH514)

    GENESIS BÁEZ

    NUBES (CLOUDS), 2019

    Genesis Báez is a Brooklyn based artist working primarily in photography and video. Báez produces work exploring themes of transference, imagination, sensorial memory, and the multidimensionality of presence that is rooted in the artist's diasporic experience. These interests stem from considering how people create space and relate to place and one another in the aftermath of mass migration.

     

    "Clouds was made from a place of rest and curiosity, in a time of immense precarity and suspension as we grapple with the consequences of climate change, capitalist exploitation of nations and the planet, and regimes of colonial power. In a time when it seemed that Puerto Rico, disaster, and death were often conflated by the media and the endless images that so rapidly circulated it, I felt a deep urgency to respond with slowness and to center subjectivity. The making of Clouds (and the finished work) is a space to exercise imagination in a time of loss and change. Clouds considers the ways in which absence is a space that is not always empty." -Genesis Báez

     

    To view a short clip of the video, please click here

  • LAKELA BROWN, COMPOSITION WITH ROUND EARRINGS, HEART EARRINGS AND BAMBOO EARRINGS, 2020

    acrylic and plaster

    28.8 x 21.6 x 3 in (73 x 55 x 7.6 cm)

    (CH539)

    LAKELA BROWN

    COMPOSITION WITH ROUND EARRINGS, HEART EARRINGS AND BAMBOO EARRINGS, 2020

    Visually recalling Egyptian and Greco-Roman artifacts, Lakela Brown’s reliefs commemorate the forms of jewelry and African American vistiges that circulated during the apogee of Hip Hop. The works serve a sartorial archive of the status symbols of her childhood and function as semi-autobiographical abstractions. 

     

    Venerating emblems of affluence and aspiration, Brown’s sculptures encipher the relics of hip-hop culture as an aesthetic phenomenon. Door knocker earrings, rope chains, and Egyptian royal pendants are used as casting tools, serving as motifs of desire and aspiration. The ways in which they are removed from their original reference point of the body abstracts them, alluding to a traceable remnant of history.

  • Moved by ideas of memory, time, and change, Ann Craven produces lushly colored, sensuous paintings, whose motifs of birds, flowers, the moon, and stripes serve as a temporal record of her life and practice. Building upon what came before, she continually re-visits her compositions in an attempt to copy them exactly. While understanding the impossibility of this pursuit, Craven embraces the inevitable differences between each canvas as evidence of our constantly shifting existence and temporality.

     

    Craven has been making paintings of the moon, a symbol of time and memory. The simple, continuous subject matter gives a nod to minimalist painting, while their economic execution and visible brushstrokes conflate the momentary with the constant. Though painted with immediacy, Craven understands that these works can never fully capture the moment they seek to address. Instead, there is a perpetual, ephemeral parallax.

    • Ann Craven Moon (Full Moon, Cushing, 7-16-19, 8:55PM), 2019, 2019 oil on linen 14 x 14 inches (35.56 x 35.56 cm) (CH508)
      Ann Craven
      Moon (Full Moon, Cushing, 7-16-19, 8:55PM), 2019, 2019
      oil on linen
      14 x 14 inches (35.56 x 35.56 cm)
      (CH508)
    • Ann Craven Moon (Full Moon, Cushing, 7-15-19, 9:06PM), 2019, 2019 oil on linen 14 x 14 inches (35.56 x 35.56 cm) (CH509)
      Ann Craven
      Moon (Full Moon, Cushing, 7-15-19, 9:06PM), 2019, 2019
      oil on linen
      14 x 14 inches (35.56 x 35.56 cm)
      (CH509)
  • Davy is well known for his intimate, candle-lit chiaroscuro portraits of artists, friends, and family members closest to him in which themes of queer love, intimacy, and friendship are prevalent.

     

    Davy’s drawings of Fire Island's characteristic marram grass accentuates his adherence to the observation and study of light, atmosphere, time, and private contemplation. The works are created in 14 x 11-inch format, a scale the artist prefers precisely for the ease of drawing and the spontaneity it allows. Davy views this grass as a protector of queer land and a metaphysical observer of its history.

    • TM Davy Marram, 2019 pastel and gouache on paper 14 x 11 inches (35.6 x 27.9 cm) (CH518)
      TM Davy
      Marram, 2019
      pastel and gouache on paper
      14 x 11 inches (35.6 x 27.9 cm)
      (CH518)
    • TM Davy Marram, 2019 pastel and gouache on paper 14 x 11 inches (35.6 x 27.9 cm) (CH519)
      TM Davy
      Marram, 2019
      pastel and gouache on paper
      14 x 11 inches (35.6 x 27.9 cm)
      (CH519)
    • TM Davy Marram, 2019 pastel and gouache on paper 14 x 11 inches (35.6 x 27.9 cm) (CH520)
      TM Davy
      Marram, 2019
      pastel and gouache on paper
      14 x 11 inches (35.6 x 27.9 cm)
      (CH520)
  • SPENCER FINCH, BLOOMING CALENDAR (MY GARDEN), 2020
    watercolor and pencil on paper
    Paper: 29 1/2 x 41 in (74.9 x 104.1 cm)
    Framed: 32 1/2 x 44 1/2 in (82.5 x 113 cm)
    (CH522)

    SPENCER FINCH

    BLOOMING CALENDAR (MY GARDEN), 2020

    With light and color as his subject matter, Brooklyn-based artist Spencer Finch creates ethereal, poetic work that recreate his journey and experiences with the natural world. Resolute in his pursuit of capturing the elusive nature of our existence, Finch’s work surveys the conditions of an elapsed moment with the intention of reconstructing a specific time and place in history.

     

    “The Blooming Calendar” catalogs the dates on which flowers bloomed in Finch’s garden throughout 2020. In this abstracted visual archive, each color corresponds with an accurate watercolor study of those blooming flowers.

  • NIR HOD, THE LIFE WE LEFT BEHIND, 2020
    oil over chromed canvas
    90 x 63 in (228.6 x 160 cm)
    (CH537)

    NIR HOD

    THE LIFE WE LEFT BEHIND, 2020

    Inspired by the deteriorating yet striking patina of antiquated frescos or a baroque mirror, Nir Hod’s performative approach to painting produces highly reflective surfaces in which the viewer becomes an integral part of the composition. A commentary on society’s particularly self-absorbed and sumptuous culture, the paintings recall the didactic tale of Oscar Wilde’s hedonist, Dorian Grey. Hod divulges Dorian Grey by means of mirrored abstractions in which the viewer perceives themselves as a work of art. Beginning with labored gradient heavily laden with paint and chrome, the results produce a nuanced balance between surface elegance and painterly depth.

     

    “Our old life has now turned into a memory and the idea of these works are an interpretation of life. The chrome, which lies on top of the oil paint represents us, we as people in society; money, dreams, desire, power and beauty. All these things dissolve with the time. The underpainting, which is the background, represents nature, sunsets and sunrises, destruction, decay, history; it represents both the beautiful and the dark times.” -Nir Hod

  • PETER HUJAR, HUDSON RIVER (III), 1976
    pigmented ink print
    Image: 14 3/4 × 14 3/4 inches (37.5 cm × 37.5 cm)
    Paper: 20 × 16 inches (50.8 cm × 40.6 cm)
    Edition of 10
    (CH521)
    Courtesy The Peter Hujar Archive and Pace Gallery, New York

    PETER HUJAR

    HUDSON RIVER (III), 1976

    Peter Hujar’s photography both memorializes and monumentalizes acts of tenderness and moments of vulnerability. Highly emotional yet devoid of excess, Hujar’s photographs contemplate moments of complex, unconventional beauty. 

     

    Hudson River is one of seven images in the series. Time is juxtaposed with the very medium in which the work is produced while simultaneously requiring that time be brought to a standstill for the sake of the art form. In this case, the Hudson River evokes an allegorical connotation of time running out. 

  • ERICA MAHINAY, GILDED (DIVIDING TIME), 2019
    acrylic and gold leaf on fabric, poplar
    60 x 40 in (152.4 x 101.6 cm)
    (CH510)

    ERICA MAHINAY

    GILDED (DIVIDING TIME), 2019

    Characterized by serial gestures and suggestive imperfection, Erica Mahinay’s work conveys her interest in time as a construct of our conscious mind, perception as a controlled hallucination, and intimacy as imperative to our collective well-being. Her hues are relational and function collaboratively with the viewer’s eye and mind to create tone or sensation. 

    The physicality of Mahinay's work encourages present-ness and connection of mind and body - they test possibilities for ameliorating the fracturing and anxiety we experience in the today's world. Personal Growth becomes a lens with which to view the work - to divert from the idea of gesture as mark making, but rather, see that each piece is a process of personal re-negotiation. 

     

    “It is not important to me that someone comes away from the work feeling that they have understood it or have understood what it is I have to “say.”  What’s more important to me is offering a space to reevaluate, to notice, to activate new pathways in the brain, to reorient.” -Erica Mahinay

  • SUZANNE MCCLELLAND, FORMULA NO. 3 IN RED WITH STRONTIUM AND XENON, 2019-20
    polymer and pastel and spray paint on canvas
    85 x 75 in (215.9 x 190.5 cm)
    (CH515)

    SUZANNE MCCLELLAND

    FORMULA NO. 3 IN RED WITH STRONTIUM AND XENON, 2019-20

    Suzanne McClelland’s non-narrative paintings find their genesis in the fixed truth of formulas, solutions, code, and the essence of time itself, serving as portrayals of mechanical and verbal language that permeate our perceptive faculties. 


    Often extracting textual elements from various sources, McClelland creates space for symbolism and material possibility to extend beyond the finite constraints imposed by language. This group of richly saturated color-field paintings engage with notions of hope and its negation, eliciting a yearning for something undeniable, yet untranslatable.

     

    This work, based on the formula to build a nuclear fission bomb, treats the painting as a space to deconstruct impulses and intentions, finding the nuance in a supposed rigid formulaic construct. 

  • JULIE MEHRETU, Mind Breath Drawings (10), 2010

    graphite on paper

    Paper: 25 x 36 in (63.5 x 91.4 cm)
    Framed: 28 1/4 x 38 3/4 in (71.8 x 98.4 cm)

    (CH310) 

    JULIE MEHRETU

    Mind Breath Drawings (10), 2010

    Julie Mehretu’s work functions as a formidable visual articulation of the layers of contemporary human experience. The physical layering of marks, as well as the metaphysical layering of time, place, and history depict the psychogeographical space of our existence. Mehretu draws on the 21st-century city for inspiration, transferring its energy into her gestural application of her medium, condensing seemingly infinite urban narratives into single unified compositions. 

     

    Mind Breath and Beat Drawings allows us to follow a thread in Mehretu’s working process from the intimate and spontaneous lexicon developed on paper as the foundation for larger works on canvas. The works reveal a personal and unique language of spontaneous mark making that reference the automatic drawing and writing of the Surrealists and Chinese calligraphy.

     

  • Exchanges between people, spaces, and things serve as major themes in Adam Milner’s work by which the artist confronts queerness and engages with intimacy in a way that society traditionally struggles with. His sprawling and deeply personal practice examines notions of value and power by fostering a sense of closeness, often discovered in everyday objects and experiences.

     

    Milner’s ongoing work with blood is a hallmark of his practice. His project, Not a Pact But Not Not a Pact, comments on the body’s temporality in relation to the passage of time. The artist invites three of his friends to participate in the work by allowing him to draw their blood. Through abstract gesture, a proximal and metaphorical community is formed by the communal exchange between the artist and his participants.  

    • Adam Milner Not a Pact But Not Not a Pact, 2020 Evan's, Kevin's, and Anthony's blood on paper, artist's frame (pine, aluminum leaf, mat board, paper, PVC, nails)Paper: 12 x 9 in (30.5 x 22.9 cm) Framed: 14 1/4 x 11 1/4 in (36.2 x 28.6 cm) (CH533)
      Adam Milner
      Not a Pact But Not Not a Pact, 2020
      Evan's, Kevin's, and Anthony's blood on paper, artist's frame (pine, aluminum leaf, mat board, paper, PVC, nails)
      Paper: 12 x 9 in (30.5 x 22.9 cm)
      Framed: 14 1/4 x 11 1/4 in (36.2 x 28.6 cm)
      (CH533)
    • Adam Milner Untitled, 2020 my blood on paper, artist's frame (pine, aluminum leaf, mat board, paper, PVC, nails) Paper: 12 x 9 in (30.5 x 22.9 cm) Framed: 14 1/4 x 11 1/4 in (36.2 x 28.6 cm) (CH534)
      Adam Milner
      Untitled, 2020
      my blood on paper, artist's frame (pine, aluminum leaf, mat board, paper, PVC, nails)
      Paper: 12 x 9 in (30.5 x 22.9 cm)
      Framed: 14 1/4 x 11 1/4 in (36.2 x 28.6 cm)
      (CH534)
  • Captivated by the mechanics and materials of pre-digital photography, Alison Rossiter creates photographs without a camera by collecting decades-expired photographic paper—the oldest dating to 1900—which she then develops in her darkroom. Each paper Rossiter uses retains a unique provenance that is quick to give way to the nuanced textures and rich tonalities residing within each sheet. Rossiter works with a keen understanding of the ways in which history and material circumstance fortuitously shape what is aesthetically possible.

     

  • Williams is a sculptor and installation artist whose practice utilizes found object, often embedded with deeply personal associations, to evoke a potent, clairvoyant tone. The artist has been utilizing soap to embed materials that become trapped within the constraints of the form, unable to fully surface. The soap causes these objects to break down and abstract, like the taxidermy sparrow in Jezebel (2020), giving way to notions of cleanliness and purification.

     

    In Pest Control (2020), Williams created a drawing on paper with sharpie and poured soap over it. After peeling the paper back, the image is the result of the ink bleeding into the soap, further enforcing the idea of transference and abstraction.

    • Bri Williams Pest Control, 2020 resin, soap, wax, sharpie, frame 20 x 24 in (50.8 x 61 cm) (CH536)
      Bri Williams
      Pest Control, 2020
      resin, soap, wax, sharpie, frame
      20 x 24 in (50.8 x 61 cm)
      (CH536)
    • Bri Williams Jezebel, 2020 soap, taxidermy sparrow, wax 6 x 8 x 8 in (15.2 x 20.3 x 20.3 cm) (CH535)
      Bri Williams
      Jezebel, 2020
      soap, taxidermy sparrow, wax
      6 x 8 x 8 in (15.2 x 20.3 x 20.3 cm)
      (CH535)